The Society Management has teamed up with photographer Ezra Petronio to create a series of portraits starring ten top talents with very different experiences. Some are budding new breakout stars, others are industry icons, but each young woman represents a unique beauty of their very own and embraces their authentic selves with pride. Through this series, we want to inspire all girls with the message that each one of them are different and equally valuable within society. They are growing up in an age where more and more opportunities have become possible, and they are free to be any version of themselves they want to be. While the subject of identity is a timeless one, most recently it has been wrapped in the subject of gender issues, and today's cultural dialogue is abuzz on the matter. We chose to play on this discussion by taking a tailored approach in fashion for the project, creating an encompassing theme while staying diversified in each unique look.

We have partnered with Girls Inc. of New York City to amplify the message, “inspiring all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.” This incredible foundation offers many services to help those in need to explore ways of bettering their lives. Since 1998, they have reached girls in partnership with schools, city agencies, and community based organizations to deliver innovative programs during the school day and after school hours. We strongly encourage our site visitors to explore all the possibilities offered by Girls Inc. and consider donating, volunteering, and/or spreading awareness. Together, we stand behind the continuous growth of young women everywhere. Rather than targeting the industry audience exclusively, we are engaging the general public by posting the images at poster sizes throughout Manhattan. The images are intended to speak for themselves, charged with no elements outside of the hashtag #HerSocietyStory - deliberately leaving the onlooker to question and contemplate what it is that they are viewing, before discovering the intent of this project via our official announcement and this page a few days after the posters’ debut. Below, our participating talents share their own ideas of what it means to be a girl, their perception of an individual’s role in today’s society, and more.

ALISA AHMANN

“For me, being a woman and individual in today's world means that I am able to decide my future on my own. To create something new, to change the world to make it a little bit better, and to inspire others.”

AMILNA ESTEVAO

“Being a girl and an individual in today’s world is to be strong and confident. An example of when I believe I made a decision that most people would not is when I left my country, my family, parents to travel for my career. This is the farthest I’ve been from my country and so it has been a challenging journey, but even though I am still young, I want to be independent, focused, and all that I can be.”

ANDREJA PEJIC

“For me being a girl means being very strong, but that strength is always closely linked with intelligence. It's softer, but with a more canny edge. I grew up in a matriarchal household and I have yet to meet a man as strong as my grandmother. Today, a woman that has her own paycheck can explore her individuality more than ever. I'm still exploring mine.”

ANTONINA PETKOVIC

“For me, being a girl and individual in today's world means being strong, positive, and open-minded. And being able to handle things on your own without anyone's help.”

BHUMIKA ARORA

“Being myself is most important for me both as a girl and as an individual. Loving myself for who I am, even if it's not what the majority of the people want me to be. I have one life and I don't believe in living that life as someone's else’s idea of perfection.”

CAROLINE TRENTINI

“Nowadays, girls have more and more of their own voice and the chance to create their own history. We can choose our ways of life, ideas, and dreams. We can find women at home taking care of their kids or in powerful positions - even running for president. And each is our own choice.

When I was younger, I used to be afraid of assuming my point of view and my choices. For modeling, for example, I had to move to New York if I really wanted to follow in this industry. It is hard for a teenage girl living far from her family and friends - and certainly it was for me. But in the end I did it, and I’m happy I was able to make that decision.”

JOSEPHINE LE TUTOUR

“I am incredibly lucky to be able to be myself, and I wish everyone in this world could have this opportunity. There is not a day that I spend without thinking of all the girls in the world who aren't free to be who they really are. There is still a lot to do for equality between men and women in every part of the world.

I feel that the decisions we take every day (Which may still feel insignificant) can make our life extraordinary. Being conscious of this aspect is a great way to go forth.”

LINDSEY WIXSON

“You must feel empowered as a woman today. Look at how far we have come. My only afterthought would be how can we help each other more and step on each other less? Get rid of the plastic idea of perfection and focus on finding ways to help our bodies instead of poisoning them with anything that's wrapped in plastic. Looking at key female leaders in society, I hope we can look at what they are saying and not what their makeup, skin, or any other ornament that they are wearing look like - just listen to them.”

MOLLY BAIR

“Being a girl in today’s modern world means having confidence and loving yourself. I have been able to put my true identity, passions, and quirks on display without fear. My generation of females have the most freedom and pride in our gender, which allows us to take on the world with more confidence and love. In short, being a girl in today’s world is a gift.”

TONI GARRN

“I’m extremely grateful to be a female in today's world, because we have more power and rights to lead and live in our own strong, independent way. At the same time, I know how rare this still is globally - which is why I support women's and girls’ rights in places where they're still being treated unfairly, without equal rights to important things such as education.”

PRODUCTION CREDITS:

Photographer: Ezra Petronio - Stylist: Elizabeth Sulcer - Hair: Franco Gobbi - Makeup: Fulvia Farolfi

In partnership with Girls Inc. of New York City